Students dispute practicality of New Year’s resolutions

The+new+year+opens+way+for+a+future+filled+with+possibilities%2C+but+the+tradition+of+resolutions+may+be+left+in+the+past.+As+fewer+people+hold+on+to+the+custom%2C+some+have+all+but+lost+hope+in+fulfilling+any+resolution.+%22They+are+a+great+sort+of+theoretical+motivator%2C+but+I+don%E2%80%99t+think+anybody+except+very+few+people+actually+go+through+with+it%2C%22+senior+Brenda+Sanchez%C2%A0said.
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Students dispute practicality of New Year’s resolutions

The new year opens way for a future filled with possibilities, but the tradition of resolutions may be left in the past. As fewer people hold on to the custom, some have all but lost hope in fulfilling any resolution.

The new year opens way for a future filled with possibilities, but the tradition of resolutions may be left in the past. As fewer people hold on to the custom, some have all but lost hope in fulfilling any resolution. "They are a great sort of theoretical motivator, but I don’t think anybody except very few people actually go through with it," senior Brenda Sanchez said.

Used with permission: Pixabay

The new year opens way for a future filled with possibilities, but the tradition of resolutions may be left in the past. As fewer people hold on to the custom, some have all but lost hope in fulfilling any resolution. "They are a great sort of theoretical motivator, but I don’t think anybody except very few people actually go through with it," senior Brenda Sanchez said.

Used with permission: Pixabay

Used with permission: Pixabay

The new year opens way for a future filled with possibilities, but the tradition of resolutions may be left in the past. As fewer people hold on to the custom, some have all but lost hope in fulfilling any resolution. "They are a great sort of theoretical motivator, but I don’t think anybody except very few people actually go through with it," senior Brenda Sanchez said.

Ava Nelson, Staff Writer

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Since ancient times, reaching even 4,000 years back to the Babylonian’s promises to their gods, New Year’s resolutions have filled communities with hope and stamina for the upcoming year. While originally a religious practice to perform better in the eyes of deities, modern society has taken a secular twist on the widely disputed holiday tradition. 

“I think that New Year’s resolutions are generally a waste of time,” English teacher Derek Thomas said. “I don’t think that most people have the fortitude to stick with spontaneous resolutions.” 

Some see these resolutions as deterrents to the achievement of their overall goals that can create a negative outlook once they fall through. As fewer people hold on to the custom, some have all but lost hope in fulfilling any resolution. 

“I think they are a great sort of theoretical motivator, but I don’t think anybody except very few people actually go through with it,” senior Brenda Sanchez said. “I’ve given up after I would try to do them and then never go through with them.” 

Skepticism has crept its way into this tradition and has even caused people to turn their heads to the notion completely. While there are those that doubt New Year’s resolutions, people who remain steadfast to the custom have already began to make theirs. 

“I think they are very good and a positive aspect of people’s lives to improve them,” sophomore William Hubbard said. “My New Year’s resolution is to run more.” 

Hubbard said he wants to use the practice to better his athletic ability and to shave time off his runs for the future. Even some who may not believe in the practicality or probability of success still consider formulating New Year’s resolutions for themselves. 

“I really don’t believe in them,” freshman Yasmine Khowessah said. “I mean I’ve tried them a lot, I’ve tried them in school, and it’s worked out, but losing weight or working out I don’t do. I might do one in school maybe, or swimming.”  

The new year opens way for a future filled with possibilities, but the tradition of resolutions may be left in the past.  

“New Year’s resolutions never work in my opinion and experience,” junior Caroline Baird said. “They get your hopes up for the upcoming year, and you end up feeling disappointed. You should just try to do your best generally.” 

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