Arming teachers suggests more potential harm than good

March+for+Our+Lives+participants+of+all+ages+continue+to+rally+for+gun+control+laws+across+the+U.S.+as+more+bills+are+proposed+regarding+the+2nd+amendment.+The+movement+was+sparked+by+the+Parkland+High+School+shooting+in+Feb.+2018.
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Arming teachers suggests more potential harm than good

March for Our Lives participants of all ages continue to rally for gun control laws across the U.S. as more bills are proposed regarding the 2nd amendment. The movement was sparked by the Parkland High School shooting in Feb. 2018.

March for Our Lives participants of all ages continue to rally for gun control laws across the U.S. as more bills are proposed regarding the 2nd amendment. The movement was sparked by the Parkland High School shooting in Feb. 2018.

Flickr-Mathias Wasik

March for Our Lives participants of all ages continue to rally for gun control laws across the U.S. as more bills are proposed regarding the 2nd amendment. The movement was sparked by the Parkland High School shooting in Feb. 2018.

Flickr-Mathias Wasik

Flickr-Mathias Wasik

March for Our Lives participants of all ages continue to rally for gun control laws across the U.S. as more bills are proposed regarding the 2nd amendment. The movement was sparked by the Parkland High School shooting in Feb. 2018.

Ariana Cimino, Opinions Editor

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Flickr-Mathias Wasik
March for Our Lives participants of all ages continue to rally for gun control laws across the U.S. as more bills are proposed regarding the 2nd amendment. The movement was sparked by the Parkland High School shooting in Feb. 2018.

Gun control never seems to be an easy topic to approach. Between polarization of political parties and the occurrence of mass shootings, only disastrous events seem to breach the wall placed in front of the subject. With the Parkland shooting sparking the March for Our Lives movement, the conversation surrounding the right to bear arms has opened up discussion further. However, on the more recent end, a bill passed by the Florida senate stirs up a question asked by many: Should teachers carry weapons in school? 

The topic of arming teachers or school administration has been floating around for a good while now, the idea being that it would enable staff to protect themselves and students more effectively in case of an emergency. Florida legislature has passed a bill May 1 enabling school staff to carry them if their district chooses to do so, bringing the seemingly baseless proposition to life. 

Although this sounds good in theory, take a moment to consider the consequences. Although an extreme worst-case-scenario, what if a gun-wielding staff member were to become the perpetrator of a school shooting? From the standpoint of a student, I can understand the appeal behind protection at any cost, but in this case, I feel as if the costs outweigh the benefits. Even with going through the mandatory 144-hour training course, we already have school security. I don’t think it needs to go further than that. 

Despite this not posing much of an effect on our school due to Hillsborough County superintendent Jeff Eakins opting out of participation in the act, if this were to spread to other states, what would the impact be?  

Minorities of all ages, regardless of social standing, already constantly worry about dangerous situations such as police brutality and prejudice taken to a violent level (but of course, that is another argument altogether). Even if it seems unlikely, who’s to say a staff won’t pose the same “I thought they were doing something suspicious” and make a rash decision? It’s happened in the past, albeit not in schools. The last thing we need is for the problem to spread even further. 

Whether someone considers themselves left or right wing, I feel most people can agree that decisive action needs to be taken regarding gun control sooner or later. Think about it: In a nation where guns spread like diseases, the last thing we need is to bring them into our singular supposed safe place. You wouldn’t send your child to school with a gun, even if they knew how to use it. What difference does it make if there are guns there anyways? 

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