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The student-run news site of H. B. Plant High School

PHS News

The student-run news site of H. B. Plant High School

PHS News

The Truth Behind Valentine’s Day

Valentine%E2%80%99s+Day+is+not+what+you+really+think+it+is.+There+is+a+dark+love+story+behind+it+all.+Find+out+the+truth+about+Valentine%E2%80%99s+Day+and+where+it+got+its+name.+
Kate Fairbairn
Valentine’s Day is not what you really think it is. There is a dark love story behind it all. Find out the truth about Valentine’s Day and where it got its name.

Valentine’s Day is known as the day everyone gives chocolates, flowers, and cards. What is the truth behind this so-called “Love Day?” Back in the 5th century, a man named St. Valentine was known for ministering to persecuted Christians in the Roman Empire. Valentine was secretly performing weddings on couples so the husbands involved could escape conscription of the pagan army; his emperor Claudius made it against the law for Roman soldiers to marry as he thought they should be completely devoted to Rome.  

On the other hand, Valentine wanted to present his belief in the importance of love and allowing loving for those who could not. On Feb. 14 the martyr Saint Valentine was killed for having other religious beliefs that Emperor Claudius did not believe in, this day became a religious holiday known as Valentine’s Day.  

Back then, Feb. 14 was celebrated as a Christian feast day that honored Saint Valentine through religious and commercial celebration of romance and love in many religions of the world. Nowadays religions throughout the world celebrate the holiday as a day to give each other candy and flowers, showing each other love.  

Where did the so-called “Be My Valentine” proposal come from? While Valentine was in jail awaiting death, he fell in love with his jailer’s daughter who frequently visited in prison. Before Valentine was sentenced to death, he sent a letter to the daughter signed “from your Valentine.”  

Later on in 700 BC Cupid was created and celebrated Valentine’s Day being the goddess of love. Cupid’s arrow represents a symbol of romance instead of death-dealing war. Across the world, Valentine’s Day is celebrated to get with your loved ones and remember what early on martyrs died for. 

 

 

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About the Contributor
Kate Fairbairn, Culture Editor

Hi! I’m Kate, I am a Junior at Plant and this is my second year on staff. I am the Editor of Culture and I’m super excited to read and write cultural articles! I enjoy the beach, baking, and shopping. Can’t wait for another great year of Pep O’ Plant!

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